An Exercise in Patience

I am not, by nature, a patient person. Unless we’re talking about babies with colic or some other malady that has them crying incessantly (and is not mine), in which case I can sit with, rock, walk with and/or snuggle said babies for hours to give mom and/or dad a reprieve. Don’t believe me? Ask my mother, I did this often as a teenager. But I digress…
I was discussing different metrics measured via blood test this morning with a loved one and how the information obtained doesn’t always tell the whole story, that often those numbers are an indicator of symptomology, not root cause. For example, high LDL is actually a symptom of PCOS, which makes sense when looking at the root cause of PCOS, that being metabolic syndrome. My LDL has been high for my entire adulthood, regardless of diet, including my 18 months as a vegan. If diet had been the cause, surely a vegan diet would have corrected it, yes?
Nope. As a matter of fact, it got worse. Per the current dietary recommendations from our esteemed government organizations and various big pharma-backed “medical” associations, it should have though.
We’ve all heard it: Rome wasn’t built in a day. But it is still very hard to be patient when we just want to hurry up and be healed already. It is a serious exercise in patience to attack the root cause of an illness. We don’t get sick overnight. It often takes years for these things to develop to the point where we exhibit any kind of symptoms and then we’re lucky if we get an accurate diagnosis right away.
It’s unrealistic for me or anyone else to expect to be healed overnight. And yet…
Here’s the upside to things taking time: when we focus on the progress, not the outcome, we are creating habits that are transferable. Think of it in terms of employment: when you want to change career paths, you focus on transferable skills. When we focus on the daily behaviors necessary for us to create healing, we’ve inoculated ourselves against relapse because those habits will then, ideally, be with us for the rest of our lives.
This also teaches us a great deal about our respective innate resiliency. When I’m feeling like I’m failing (which, by the way, is NOT the end of the world), this resiliency is quick to remind me of where I started. It’s quick to show me where I’ve been successful in long term journeys (motherhood anyone?).
My greatest hope is that my patience will pay off in resilience dividends. What I’m trying to create is a resilient body and mind and life. Everything I do, for the most part, is a step in that direction. Progress may be slow, but as long as I keep putting one foot in front of the other, I’ll get there eventually.
If you choose to walk a similar path, so will you.