How MLM Fits (Or Doesn’t) Into My Practice

Pampered Chef
Tupperware
Mary Kay
Avon
Beauty Counter
Lularoe
Life’s Abundance
Young Living
Beachbody
doTerra

MLM businesses are extremely popular these days and for, I’m sure, good reason. It’s actually been suggested to me that in order to succeed in building a thriving health coaching practice, I need to sign on with an MLM company due to supposed passive income possibilities and the marketing training and support.

Perhaps this is true. For some, it likely is. Some (but not all) of the above mentioned companies are excellent to work with. I’ve been approached by women on the Beachbody, Life’s Abundance, and Beauty Counter teams and each of them thoroughly love the support, the products, and the extra income. I can’t argue with that, at all. And I’m not going to. This isn’t a rant against MLM at all.

I’ve thought about this long and hard. For me, I see it as a conflict of interest.

If I’m going to preach bioindividuality, I cannot, in good conscious, try to sell anyone on specific supplements or essential oils or skin care, etc. If I know anything it’s that just because it works for me does not, at all, mean that it’ll work for you.

I also have zero interest in what I see as growing elitism in the Paleo community. I may subscribe to many of the tenants of the Paleo lifestyle, but I sure as hell am not going to push products that cost the same as a week’s worth of groceries just because they are better for you.

Here’s the thing: there are no quick fixes. You cannot undo years of unhealthy habits in a 20 day challenge. You cannot undo years of unhealthy habits by taking specific supplements. You cannot undo years of unhealthy habits with an expensive serum.

I’ve had many women with PCOS ask me about supplementation and what I use. I always hesitate. I hesitate because my type of PCOS may not be the same as yours, making what I take a waste of money for you. I hesitate because I’m still doing a bit experimentation there myself and I don’t have all the answers. I hesitate because there are laws that I have to consider that vary by state – if you live in certain states, I cannot legally even suggest supplements. All I can do is point you towards the research and let you decide for yourself.

It is for these reasons that I see, for my practice, MLM as a conflict of interest. While I know better than to say “never,” I don’t see MLM as having a place within my practice at this time. I would far rather focus on the behaviors that created the issues you want to correct than pushing products promising the world.

Remember, consistency is the secret sauce on the success burger. If you decide to try something, give it 90 days or more before you decide it doesn’t work. The idea that it takes only 30 days to create/replace a habit is a fallacy that’s been repeated ad nauseum by the publishing industry because a) we all want a quick fix and b) because it sells books/programs. I’ll point you to James Clear on this point because he’s done the research, I’m just repeating it. 30 days is just long enough for you to begin to see results (depending on the habit), so keep going.

Thoughts? Questions? Comment below or send me an email: barbara@whathealthcoacheseat.com – I’d love to hear from you.