Bioindividuality, Mantras, & Messaging

I’ve been pretty immersed in the Women’s Strength Summit the past couple of days. I’ll drown myself in it’s awesomeness again tonight.

I really didn’t intend to write about it but in two days the consistent messages are so incredibly important:

  • What works for me won’t necessarily work for you (bioindividuality)
  • Messaging matters and those messages bombard us from a very early age

It both breaks my heart and makes me angry that there isn’t a single woman in my tribe that hasn’t been directly affected by messaging. But perhaps the most natural but insidious is our own mothers’ relationship with their bodies, food, and dieting.

My mother has been on a diet for as long as I can remember. She also devoured diet books and “health” magazines, which I also devoured because I often read more mature materials than I actually was. Her reasons for dieting run the gamut but they don’t include because it feels good. It breaks my heart.

“I just want to feel better” has been my mantra for the past two years. My diet (in the original definition of the word: way of eating) has evolved to support that mantra. Yes, I still experiment and devour the latest nutrition news but its from a place of curiosity and learning instead of self-loathing and body shaming. But the numbers on the scale no longer have any power over my happiness and self-worth. I also didn’t TRY to lose weight, it just happened, and continues to do so.

I hadn’t realized it until it was mentioned as a possible tactic for minimizing personal exposure to detrimental messaging, but at the same time I decided I just wanted to feel better I eliminated all magazines from my life, including Yoga Journal. It wasn’t something I consciously decided to do, but it certainly fell in line with my new mantra. I’m positive it is one of the things that has made getting to my version of healthy much simpler. I can better focus on what works for me, not whatever celebrity gracing the cover of whatever publication in the checkout lane. I won’t even read them in the doctor’s office.

Maybe my pop culture knowledge is lacking as a result but I can say with glee that pop culture has zero interest or priority for me. Perhaps that makes me weird but I’ll gladly wave that flag. I’m certainly healthier for it.